Your leaking thatched hut during the restoration of a pre-Enlightenment state.

 

Hello, my name is Judas Gutenberg and this is my blaag (pronounced as you would the vomit noise "hyroop-bleuach").



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Like my brownhouse:
   nasty with clotted
Saturday, November 17 2012
This morning Gretchen got up early to go to Massachusetts with our friend Paul (the guy with the church in the Rondout) and a few others to look at the land he bought (or is buying) in the Berkshires. They would end up slowly meandering through a forest, cataloging trees to be cut down for dollars. And then they would eat dinner at a restaurant in Great Barrington.
Meanwhile I spent my day back at the house. Mostly what I did was bring home and split firewood from the tree I cut down back in March at the edge of the field of our uphill neighbors. Most of that wood is Red Oak (an easy-to-split species), though a Chestnut Oak and some species of hickory were also brought down in the general clusterfuck caused by Irene. To aid in my retrieval of this wood (which I'd been bringing home via handtruck), today I emptied my wood cart (which has spent the better part of a year 80 feet down the Stick Trail fully loaded with old pieces of bone-dry American Chestnut), pumped up its tires, and put it back into service. Since modifying it to use unspoked wheels and adding longer poles for me to use when pulling it, it's been very useful. But with all of my experience retrieving firewood using various wheeled devices, I have ideas for how to make a much better cart. With that in mind, today I ordered a pair of 13 inch pneumatic wheels (and a number of other items) from HarborFreight.com, the company with the most thoroughly Chinese-made products in America.

This evening I started painting the wooden bits around the windows in the greenhouse upstairs. I started with white primer and off-white eggshell interior paint, but then quickly moved on to an old can of glossy white. The old paint was nasty with clots, but this gave a nice antique texture to the paint job.


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http://asecular.com/blog.php?121117

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