INTRO
WHEN I WAS FIFTEEN
ALONG 693
THE ABORTION PALACE
GROWING UP, TWO AMERICAS
ANNIVERSARY 1984
TO BETTY, 1982
BEYOND NORTH MOUNTAIN
THE BRANDY LINE (ABOUT A FAVORITE GOAT)
CHICAGO AND NORTHWESTERN
DREAM OF CHARLES DE LANGLADE
YOU CALL ME FOLLY MILLS
THE ODYSSEY OF GLOOMY GUS
HILLS
IMPATIENS CAPENSIS
THE ADVANTAGE OF INTELLIGENCE
I DIDN'T KNOW YOU THEN
AFTER YOU LANGLADE
WAITING ON LARAMIE CREEK
THE LESSON
LITTLE RIVER
MEMORY
THE HUMAN CONDITION IS NOT
OLD DOMINION
OLD MAN TO HIMSELF
OLD RIDER
CALLING OWLS
FROM THE TALE OF PETER MINK
MAKE REVOLUTION
THE SCRAPER
MY SHIP
SNAPSHOT
TO OUR SONS, 1982
SPRING PEEPERS
TED
TREES OF NEW JERSEY
A TRUE DOCTOR
DEATH OF WILBUR
BY WINNEBAGO'S SHORE
©Poems of R.F.Mueller- Other Times, Other Thoughts

MUSIC AT THE JACKSON
(enjoyed frequently with my Love!)
R.F. Mueller


Inside the bluegrass is authentic
As the flight of banjos to the stars,
The low ambrosial strumming
Of the electric-juiced guitars,
The sound of mandolins that weave
A belt of jewels across the room.
But is this the sad metallic ringing
That broke the twilight of the coves,
Or that can call up again the shadows
Of-the winding river groves,
Brought to the Stonewall Jackson from afar?

2.
Outside the Datsuns and Toyotas
Snap in the balmy evening air.
Yet not a single wheel is dented
By the broken axle roads
That snake downhill like rivers
With their gravel in repose.
And the long haired youthful players
Who drove them here today
Left apartments in the city
Where they never learned to pray.

3.
Think then of a lonely hollow
And the hills in evening's fire,
When a sweat-soaked lanky player
Puts his cornfield's rows to rest,
And lets his fancy light the shake-roofed cabin
In the quiet mountain gloom,
As his melody climbs upward
To meet the rising moon.

4.
And remember that at present
All we can ever know
Is that we're at the Hotel Jackson
For a night, a drink, a show.

 

annotation

The Stonewall Jackson Hotel was part of a niche in the "good life" of our new Virginia home, although it conflicted flagrantly with the ideal of self-sufficiency professed by homesteaders like us. In addition to weekly evening entertainment, I on occasion joined Betty-who taught at the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind- there for sumptuous noon meals that only increased my guilt!